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Could someone be otherkin with a primitive human species?

Koa

Member
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Masculine
This question came out of pure curiosity.

I know people are otherkin with "nonhuman" species, but I was wondering if that potentially includes non-Homo sapien (the species extant, modern humans are) human species, or is just limited to any species not within the human lineage?

Could someone technically be otherkin with say, a species of Australopithecus or Ardipithecus? Maybe even another Homo species besides Homo sapiens? What's the limit in the wording "nonhuman"?
 

Jeb_CC

Well-known member
+Primal Member
Xenogender Pride
Otherkin
Asexual Pride
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I can't see why not. I don't think there's anything to say that you can't reincarnate as another human or similar species, but I admittedly don't know too much about the reincarnation beliefs.
There are some Factkin that even identify as living people but it's a whole argument and debate about how that's possible and the ethics behind it. Calling a human stuck in another human body probably doesn't match the Otherkin term exactly, as Other implies Non-Human. But I suppose it could also imply something other than one's current self and being.
 

magicdoll

Mystical Fish
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This is an interesting thing to consider. I think it is definitely possible, but I don't know if I would specifically call it otherkin. I think I would coin a new term for it.
 

Koa

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This is an interesting thing to consider. I think it is definitely possible, but I don't know if I would specifically call it otherkin. I think I would coin a new term for it.
The idea of it having a different term is very interesting. Maybe anthrokin? lol
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I can't see why not. I don't think there's anything to say that you can't reincarnate as another human or similar species, but I admittedly don't know too much about the reincarnation beliefs.
There are some Factkin that even identify as living people but it's a whole argument and debate about how that's possible and the ethics behind it. Calling a human stuck in another human body probably doesn't match the Otherkin term exactly, as Other implies Non-Human. But I suppose it could also imply something other than one's current self and being.
I thought about it being based in reincarnation, too. I just didn't see why someone couldn't have been another human species in a past life, especially as they all pretty much went extinct millions of years ago, even if they technically are still "human".

I've heard about Factkin before, which is... interesting.
 
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night

Active member
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i believe in it. hominid evolution is complex and diverse. you could identify as a homo erectus or even an australopithecus. the lifestyles of human ancestors were all variable: their cultures, behaviors and physiology would depend on the species and resources available to them. its hard to fathom, but different human species occupying the earth was the normal before now. the complexity alone is enough to convince me someone could be a neanderthal therian. i am on the fence on such topics as people identifying with historical figures or homo sapiens of times prior

kc8mpt.jpg
 

Koa

Member
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i believe in it. hominid evolution is complex and diverse. you could identify as a homo erectus or even an australopithecus. the lifestyles of human ancestors were all variable: their cultures, behaviors and physiology would depend on the species and resources available to them. its hard to fathom, but different human species occupying the earth was the normal before now. the complexity alone is enough to convince me someone could be a neanderthal therian. i am on the fence on such topics as people identifying with historical figures or homo sapiens of times prior

kc8mpt.jpg
Thank you for your in depth answer! I agree that human evolution is very complex and diverse. Other humans weren't just other "versions" of us, for lack of a better phrasing, and are considered distinct species for a reason, including the lifestyle differences you listed.
 

Red-in-Tooth

Machairodont Felid
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Therianthrope
Golden Shield
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The short answer as previously established is "yes", however I am prone to add the caveat that clarity becomes increasingly unlikely the closer to modern hominids one approaches. This is not because there is some hypothetical metaphysical limit - not a real argument for one at least - rather because as one shifts up the spectrum of ape ancestry and approaches the anatomically modern human even by millions and hundreds of thousands of years, it becomes more and more difficult to distinguish that species from anything different than a human experience. Other than say, the obvious sense of inhumanity and being just ever so slightly out of alignment with it.

Another example of this I will illustrate is that a common and recurrent issue of the fact canine therians tend to have great difficulty distinguishing any one canid species from the other in most cases. This is by no means a swipe at them but without intensive study, the end result is often just "wolf" without much conclusion that there might not only be other subspecies, it may even be a similar yet unrelated canid. A further, more extreme example, would be canine therians who have issues differentiating breeds of dog. One could apply this to other species as well, even subspecies of the same species which are remarkably different such as Panthera leo leo versus Panthera leo melanochaita would be exceedingly difficult to discern one way or another because what distinguishes them most tends to be more geographical and genetic than overt.

So far as I can determine, it would take incredible levels of introspection and research to even cast a wide enough yet reasonable enough net to determine a single deviation within Homo.
 
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