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bodhidharma    17

I wasn't sure where to post a topic about martial arts, the art forum seemed like the best bet. 

BOXERS, FENCERS, GRAPPLERS, FIGHTERS - REPORT IN 

Introduce yourself and tell us about your martial art! How you got into it, how long you've been studying and practicing it, and what it's done for you.  

For example: 

 Hey everyone! I'm dharma! I study Tang Soo Do, and I have been for about a year at this point. I'm working towards a green belt currently. I love it, and it's kinda weird because I got into studying TSD after an injury and I never imagined I'd be such a martial arts nerd. I could talk about what it's done for me forever, but I can summarize it as TSD is a way of life that I've adopted and it just keeps enriching my life so long as I put in the blood, sweat, and tears. 

Now, I am going to implement one rule: 

This topic IS NOT a platform to debate what styles would win a fight. This is just the meet n' greet. 

 Just keep it clean and come out swinging. 

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Shezep    446

I've been practicing Tai Chi for twelve years. Before that I did a little Aikido, Iaido and SCA fencing. 

I started out doing a standard Yang style of the Cheng Man Ching variety. Currently I'm learning Imperial Yang, which is closer to the original. They're both Yang, but the difference between the two is enormous. Standard Yang puts more emphasis on physical alignments, while Imperial is all about the chi. Of course, it helps to know the physical side first so you don't bring any bad habits into it.

When high level Tai Chi is done correctly, the results feel effortless, and they look fake. The opponent is no longer there. The chi just moves through the space. "Four ounces of pressure," they say. We go for precision instead of force. It's the closest thing to being a Jedi that I know. The hard part is being able to do it consistently, and with people you haven't trained with. 

On the way to that, you learn sensitivity. You know what your own chi is doing. You know your own alignments. Once you know your own, you can sense it in another with just a touch. There are layers and layers of technique that are slowly added into the form. Tai chi is not the form. The form is just a method of practicing an entirely new way of moving and being. 

 

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Kitsune33    0

Ive been doing karate for more than half my life (7 years) and ive been doing taisho jutsu for two, I have been experimenting recently with my own form of mixed martial arts. I have recently started learning high level kata. questions welcome 

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bodhidharma    17
2 hours ago, Kitsune33 said:

Ive been doing karate for more than half my life (7 years) and ive been doing taisho jutsu for two, I have been experimenting recently with my own form of mixed martial arts. I have recently started learning high level kata. questions welcome 

What type of karate do you study? Kyokushin?

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Obsidian    5

I did Tai Kwon Do in much of my early life, stopped participating after getting my 3rd degree black belt because the dojos in my area were getting political and treating certain students (sometimes myself) really crummy for reasons I'd rather not get into. I box from time to time at a local gym, but mostly I just practice on punching bags to keep my mobility up. I rarely spar anymore.

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Recently, I've practiced some Historical European Martial Arts (HEMA) with a focus on the German Longsword. Unfortunately, the guy who was teaching me had to move, so I only studied it for about a year. I really enjoy watching Skallagrim's Youtube channel, and there are a couple other good weapons and historical fighting channels that I enjoy. I also learned some Shotokan for a few years, but that was about 12 years ago while I was in high school. So, I'm really out of practice. I do admire people who are good at self-defense.

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Calico    13

I currently hold a blue belt in a type of jiu jitsu loosely based off of the Brazilian version of the art. I can't give the exact name because the founding dojo happens to be right where I live :p I really enjoyed it, but I stopped practicing about a year ago due to my bum knee and some stuff that went down with the dojo. I did it for three years though, and it was a blast. I might give taekwondo a shot when I can afford it.

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Tarielarwen    2

I did Taekwondo for many years and I really loved it. I don't think it was my 'ultimate style'. I started running into restrictions due to my size. (short and small). 

I do more of a mixed style now, that is less reliant on size. It suits me much better in that respect.

I do miss the patterns we did for Taekwondo though. I found them so grounding. Everything else would disappear.

I also did historical reenactment fighting with metal weapons and armour. That's something I want to return to. I love using metal weapons, sparing one on one was so much fun, and the group battles were fantastic.

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Syan    13

I've been practicing Jun Fang for about 4 or 5 years. But I feel that my true calling is Wing Chun and Tai Chi. I can just grasp the concepts much better and they come out natural. For years I told myself, that I must have had the past life of a martial artist. It might be related to one of my kin types which makes it even more nteresting.

I want to learn to fight with weapons. The most I practiced is with a dagger and a staff. My formal experience is limited. But I've been trying to fill in the blanks and create motions that feel right when I practice strikes.

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bodhidharma    17
20 minutes ago, Syan said:

I've been practicing Jun Fang for about 4 or 5 years. But I feel that my true calling is Wing Chun and Tai Chi. I can just grasp the concepts much better and they come out natural. For years I told myself, that I must have had the past life of a martial artist. It might be related to one of my kin types which makes it even more nteresting.

I want to learn to fight with weapons. The most I practiced is with a dagger and a staff. My formal experience is limited. But I've been trying to fill in the blanks and create motions that feel right when I practice strikes.

I did Wing Chun for a few months before focusing solely on Tang Soo Do; it's an amazingly elegant and simple style. But while they do have weapons, the weapons more serve as a tool to improve your empty handed techniques. The 6.5 Pole builds up your punching power, and the Butterfly Swords teach you speed. 

If you want a good read, pick up "The Dao of Wing Chun". It's mind blowing. 

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bodhidharma    17
1 hour ago, Tarielarwen said:

I did Taekwondo for many years and I really loved it. I don't think it was my 'ultimate style'. I started running into restrictions due to my size. (short and small). 

I do more of a mixed style now, that is less reliant on size. It suits me much better in that respect.

I do miss the patterns we did for Taekwondo though. I found them so grounding. Everything else would disappear.

I also did historical reenactment fighting with metal weapons and armour. That's something I want to return to. I love using metal weapons, sparing one on one was so much fun, and the group battles were fantastic.

The Hyung are my favorite part of TSD, they're an excellent moving meditation. The mindset you begin to develop is one of constant flow and presence and it's a feeling I want to bring into my everyday life. 

I would love to get into historical fencing, HEMA and the like. I've always been drawn to sickle weapons like kamas and scythes. 

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Syan    13
8 minutes ago, bodhidharma said:

I did Wing Chun for a few months before focusing solely on Tang Soo Do; it's an amazingly elegant and simple style. But while they do have weapons, the weapons more serve as a tool to improve your empty handed techniques. The 6.5 Pole builds up your punching power, and the Butterfly Swords teach you speed. 

If you want a good read, pick up "The Dao of Wing Chun". It's mind blowing. 

Thank you for the book reference! I will try to take a look for it. What I definitely need to practice on is using dual weapons. I don't have it in my muscle memory to maneuver two different weapons at the same time.

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bodhidharma    17
11 minutes ago, Syan said:

Thank you for the book reference! I will try to take a look for it. What I definitely need to practice on is using dual weapons. I don't have it in my muscle memory to maneuver two different weapons at the same time.

Wing Chun is chock full of that. One of its core concepts is simultaneous attack and defense. 

The Family I practiced was Yip Man style, and three techniques I first learned were Pak Da, Tan Da, and Lop Da. All of them require the use of both hands. Even the punching does, it's a little tricky to master at first - moving both hands in different directions - but once you learn it it feels natural.

Even in my private study of TSD, I sometimes practice Wing Chun because while the concepts are distinctly Wing Chun, they are still important. Economy of movement, simultaneous technique, trapping limbs, etc. 

I could could gush forever. It's definitely worth finding a good Sifu. 

 

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Syan    13

I've practiced those hand movements in Wing Chun, and I caught onto it pretty quickly. If anything, that fighting technique is my strongest point. But when I use weapons, I feel like I get confused with what to do with the weapon on my other hand. Would I just copy those hand techniques onto a dagger? I haven't practiced enough to know for certain.

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bodhidharma    17
32 minutes ago, Syan said:

I've practiced those hand movements in Wing Chun, and I caught onto it pretty quickly. If anything, that fighting technique is my strongest point. But when I use weapons, I feel like I get confused with what to do with the weapon on my other hand. Would I just copy those hand techniques onto a dagger? I haven't practiced enough to know for certain.

For some weapons, like the kamas for example, you can just use them to mimic the hand techniques. This is true for TSD, karatedo, and other arts like Eskrima (which is built around using one handed weapons). 

As for Wing Chun, I never got that far. I only studied for six months, and the swords form is more advanced. 

But don't let that stop you from experimenting! I play with my wooden kamas (gonna get a sickle soon) and I find that the sign of a good weapon is that you can apply what you know and it can still be effective. A punch with the kamas can either be jamming the blunt head into your opponent's chest, or a quick forward stabbing motion with that delicious blade. 

I imagine there's plenty of literature on the subject. The kamas aren't a traditional TSD weapon, they're Okinawan Kobudo actually, but there's a few articles and books that helped me figure things out. 

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 I made it to blue belt in judo and green belt in karate but that was all a very long time ago. I don't remember any katas  but I still remember the stances and a lot of it is muscle memory. There are some moves that I am fond of and that have come in useful over the years so I'm glad I participated.   My first nursing gig was in a rough trauma center and people came in wild sometimes. It was helpful.  

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bodhidharma    17
6 hours ago, Helena Sheibler said:

 I made it to blue belt in judo and green belt in karate but that was all a very long time ago. I don't remember any katas  but I still remember the stances and a lot of it is muscle memory. There are some moves that I am fond of and that have come in useful over the years so I'm glad I participated.   My first nursing gig was in a rough trauma center and people came in wild sometimes. It was helpful.  

Judo is a great art, it's hard to argue with a style where you hit someone with the planet they were standing on.

While I have experiencing in nursing, I have heard my fair share of stories. One nurse I spoke to said she began studying Krav Maga when her unit received a patient with a history of groping the attending nurses. 

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@bodhidharma  getting groped is nothing. Honestly, whatever keeps them still and content while I'm doing the saline lock works for me.  Lol.   Of course, I work in geriatrics and hospice now where that kind of behavior is not terribly threatening.   I started out in emergency medicine and yeah you get a different class of groper there.   I don't blame her.  

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bodhidharma    17
11 minutes ago, Helena Sheibler said:

@bodhidharma  getting groped is nothing. Honestly, whatever keeps them still and content while I'm doing the saline lock works for me.  Lol.   Of course, I work in geriatrics and hospice now where that kind of behavior is not terribly threatening.   I started out in emergency medicine and yeah you get a different class of groper there.   I don't blame her.  

*I have no experience in nursing, I meant.

I can only imagine what goes on in hospitals. I work graveyard security and I've had a few exciting moments, like a guy twisted out of his mind on PCP. 

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On 8/15/2017 at 10:23 PM, bodhidharma said:

*I have no experience in nursing, I meant.

I can only imagine what goes on in hospitals. I work graveyard security and I've had a few exciting moments, like a guy twisted out of his mind on PCP. 

Yikes.  Yeah, that's not good at all.   Glad you got out of it OK.  

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